Going for Lunch

1. Saying Hello

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2. Introduction to Tones

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3. Ordering a Coffee

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4. Airport - Arriving

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5. Taxi - Going to Hotel

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6. Hotel - Checking In

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7. Numbers 1-10

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8. Breakfast

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9. Shopping

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10. Introducing yourself

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11. Meeting a Colleague

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12. Going for Lunch

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13. Ordering Lunch

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14. Numbers 11 to 999

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15. In the Office

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16. Telling the Time

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17. Ordering Dinner

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18. Having Dinner

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19. Days of the Week

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20. Booking a Day Trip

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21. Sightseeing

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22. Taking the Subway

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23. Asking for Directions

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24. Buying a Phone

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25. At the Bar

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26. Karaoke with Friends

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27. Planning Meeting

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28. Giving a Presentation

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29. Leisure Centre

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30. Talking about Family

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31. Months of the Year

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32. Weather

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33. Visiting the Bank

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34. At the Market

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35. At the Post Office

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36. Sightseeing

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37. Contract Extension

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38. Café Lunch

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39. Apartment Search

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40. Hotel Checking Out

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Here you'll learn how to arrange to go for lunch with a colleague in China. You'll learn how to respond if asked are you hungry, and do you want to eat some Chinese food. The waitress uses the polite way of asking 'how many people?', and you will learn the polite way to respond in Mandarin Chinese!

At the office, Dani asks you if you want to go for lunch. As you are hungry, you eagerly accept the opportunity to go for some Chinese food and learn some essential Mandarin Chinese vocabulary. The business districts in Chinese cities are usually well serviced by many restaurants offering tempting lunch menus.

You'll find many different types of restaurants to choose from at lunchtime in China. Blue collar workers can be seen at food stalls and kiosks enjoying simple but tasty fare - usually with large portions of rice or noodles. Western snacks such as sandwiches and burgers are readily available, along with traditional Chinese lunch dishes. Many restaurants cater for business lunches which feature plenty of elaborate Chinese dishes served in the middle of the table to share.



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