Asking for Directions

1. Saying Hello

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2. Introduction to Tones

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3. Ordering a Coffee

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4. Airport - Arriving

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5. Taxi - Going to Hotel

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6. Hotel - Checking In

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7. Numbers 1-10

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8. Breakfast

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9. Shopping

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10. Introducing yourself

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11. Meeting a Colleague

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12. Going for Lunch

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13. Ordering Lunch

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14. Numbers 11 to 999

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15. In the Office

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16. Telling the Time

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17. Ordering Dinner

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18. Having Dinner

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19. Days of the Week

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20. Booking a Day Trip

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21. Sightseeing

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22. Taking the Subway

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23. Asking for Directions

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24. Buying a Phone

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25. At the Bar

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26. Karaoke with Friends

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27. Planning Meeting

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28. Giving a Presentation

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29. Leisure Centre

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30. Talking about Family

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31. Months of the Year

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32. Weather

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33. Visiting the Bank

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34. At the Market

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35. At the Post Office

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36. Sightseeing

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37. Contract Extension

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38. Café Lunch

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39. Apartment Search

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40. Hotel Checking Out

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It's not unusual to need to ask for directions when visiting any foreign country. If you can't find someone who speaks English, it can help to know some relevant Chinese words and phrases. People in Chinese will usually be keen to help you find your way, but you may need to meet them halfway!

Dani can't remember the exact location of the mobile phone shop, and asks somebody on the street for directions. Leo learns his left from his right in Mandarin Chinese. Dani also teaches him how to say walk straight ahead, and turn at a particular set of traffic lights. When they arrive at the shopping centre, Leo learns how to say which floor, and whether he wants to go to the shop on the left or the one on the right.

Chinese people tend to ask strangers for directions more than Westerners. As a foreigner, you may usually feel than if you have the correct address and a map, that you can find your way yourself. In China, taking this approach can lead to long walks and frustration. So don't be afraid to ask a local if you feel you're starting to wander aimlessly.



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